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Why a NATURAL DEATH expo?

The term ‘natural’ conjures up all kinds of ideas, thoughts and emotions in people. The very mention of the word “death” is uncomfortable and unpleasant enough for people, but coupling the word ‘death’ with the word ‘natural’ seems to imply that suffering, sadness and woe are inevitable and that no one would ever want a ‘natural’ death. Perhaps as some might view ‘natural’ birth as a process of being a martyr and suffering needlessly.

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What is a NATURAL or GREEN burial?

The Natural Burial Association of Canada defines a natural burial as “is the act of returning a body as naturally as possible to the earth”. In order for a burial to be a natural or green burial, the body would not be embalmed, and would be in a biodegradable container. A rigid burial container would be made of plain, unvarnished wood, or bamboo or wicker, with no glue or metal used in the construction. If lined, it would be lined with natural fabric like cotton or linen. The body can also be wrapped in a shroud made of natural fibres – cotton, linen, hemp or silk. Cardboard burial containers are also available through many funeral homes and cremation services.*

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What is a GREEN or NATURAL funeral?

A green funeral would be a funeral where the deceased person is not embalmed, or is embalmed using “green” or “natural” substances. It is also possible to keep a body cool for viewing using dry ice. A green funeral would be a funeral service where an emphasis would be placed on reducing the environmental footprint of the entire service. Currently, there is only one funeral home in Ontario specializing in green funerals and burials – eco Cremation & Burial Services.

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What is a HOME FUNERAL?

A home funeral is a viewing and/or funeral service that takes place in the home – just like it used to be 100 years ago or so. It is legal to have a home funeral in Ontario. Legal next of kin are able to claim the body of their dead loved one, and are able to register to death and obtain a burial permit on their own as well, though it is not yet common – in fact, is extremely rare – in Ontario at this time.

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